South Africa Day 19 – Tsitsikamma, Arniston/Waenhuiskrans

Today we had a delicious breakfast at the Fernery (I have been eating roasted muesli with natural yoghurt, bran muffins, and latte for breakfast every single day – I just cannot get enough!), spotted a whale while we were eating, and then packed for our long drive to Arniston.

Today was more than six hours driving from Tsitsikamma to the fishing village of Arniston/Waenhuiskrans. Arniston is the only place in South Africa with two names and also the only one named after a shipwreck. Prior to the wreck of Arniston, it was known as Waenhuiskrans, an Afrikaans name (meaning ‘wagon house cliff’) after a local sea cave large enough to accommodate a wagon and a span of oxen.

The entire village of Kassiesbaai (right next to Arniston harbour), with its limewashed, thatched fishermen’s cottages, is a national monument. It is the last authentic fishing village in the country.

We drove straight through apart from a quick stop in Houwhoek for coffee, and arrived in Arniston at about 4.30pm – a 6-hour drive.

We checked into the Arniston Hotel and Spa which is stunning and has a huge spa facility with five full-time therapists. We had a huge room with a beautiful sea view, where we could watch the chuckies (small, colourfully painted wooden fishing boats, each with 7 – 10 crew) coming and going. In this area of the country, the sea is the most incredible azure hue.

They had lots of specials on the spa menu as it was low season so I had a 90 minute long mud exfoliating body treatment (you are wrapped in plastic with heatpads over you so you really sweat), foot massage, and scalp massage, which cost $30. They use Kalahari products, which I love.

After that we had a lovely relaxing dinner in the dining room. For dessert I had black forest cake!

All the places at which we have stayed included breakfast in the price. The breakfast spreads have all been fantastic – you can order your eggs or omelettes as you want them, and choose from a huge spread of hot and cold dishes, including fresh fruit and local dishes. There have always been gluten-free, sugar-free, and lactose-free options.



Categories: Southern Africa

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