Love Locks – Curse or Blessing?

The craze of love locks is a recent one. It may be (as is often claimed) an ‘ancient tradition’ but tourists fastening them to bridges in different destinations is definitely a new one. And, in my eyes, now that it is so widespread, not a good one. It is destroying historical bridges. Even small bridges have almost 100 metric tons’ worth of locks all over them. A recipe for disaster.

What happened to leaving only your footprints behind when visiting beautiful spots? How many of the couples are still together? Why leave something behind that could damage something in a country that is not your own? It seems so inconsiderate!

There is even a site which makes a living by selling love locks. One thing I do like on this site is the small metal trees you can buy for your wedding where guests fasten a lock upon which they have engraved a special message for the happy couple. Would be nice to have one on each table at the reception. Though probably you would not want them in your home on your mantlepiece for the rest of your life. Something to think about…

the Pont des Arts over the River Seine with the Ile de la Cite beyond, Paris, France
2005. Pont des Arts – Paris, France
A couple enjoy the view from the Pont des Arts, which is now covered in love locks
Present day. Pont des Arts, now covered in love locks
Broken due to the weight of the locks. Photo from the anti love lock campaign.
Broken due to the weight of the locks. Photo from the anti love lock campaign.
Removing locks in Rome
Removing locks in Rome
Swedish Parliament. The locks are regularly removed but they proliferate almost immediately
Swedish Parliament. The locks are regularly removed but they proliferate almost immediately
Closer view of the Swedish Parliament bridge locks
Closer view of the Swedish Parliament bridge locks

 

Author: Janet Carr

Fashion, beauty and animal loving language consultant from South Africa living in Stockholm, Sweden.

5 thoughts

  1. I agree with this completely – excellent points! The first time I read an article about part of a bridge collapsing because of the locks I wondered why it continues to be allowed. If the city officials believe that this practice should be continued they should at least come up with a plan to reduce the number of locks on the bridges. Each city should send a crew out at the end of every month and clip off locks for the number of divorces that occurred in the country. To catch up, clip off the amount of locks for the total amount of divorces that occurred since the first lock was attached. They could even have some fun with it….Have a drawing, and organize an event allowing the “100” winners to come in to vent feelings on the locks with a pair of bolt cutters. 😉 Seriously though, it’s difficult for me to understand why it’s not illegal.

  2. They have removed them from Le Pont des Arts and the other bridged in Paris and they have decided to remove them every 6 or 8 months. It is such a shame to damage such monuments with ugly locks. There are other ways to show love than doing that silly thing!

      1. Indeed Janet! But what really upsets me is the huge amount of money the City of Paris have to pay to get those locks removed. It sickens me to see such a waste od money just because tourists act irresponsible and do silly things.

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